Youth Issues


 

We must act now before it is to late for our youth.

These are the issues that our teens face today.

 

 

 

Education
http://www2.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/equity.pdf

About 50% of African-American and Hispanic/Latino 9th graders do not become eligible to enter college after four years of high school because they have not completed high school.

 

According to: The Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education…

 

Summary: If current trends continue, the proportion of workers with high school diplomas and college degrees will decrease and the per capita personal income of Americans will decline over the next fifteen years.

 

Fact #1: The U.S. workforce is becoming more diverse.
The U.S. workforce (generally ages 25 to 64) is in the midst of a sweeping demographic transformation. From 1980 to 2020, the white working-age population is projected to decline from 82% to 63% (see figure 1). During the same period, the minority portion of the workforce is projected to double (from 18% to 37%), and the Hispanic/Latino portion is projected to almost triple (from 6% to 17%).

 

This demographic shift can be traced to two primary causes: larger numbers of younger Americans (ages 0 to 44) are ethnic minorities, and increasing numbers of white workers are reaching retirement age. Over the next 15 years, the largest increase in the younger U.S. population is projected to be Hispanic/Latin. The younger population—including those most likely to be in school, college, or professional training—is growing ever more racially diverse.

 

Meanwhile, the largest portion of the white population is aging. The number of whites is projected to decline in all age groups younger than 45. The only age level in which whites would outpace minorities in population growth is among those reaching retirement: ages 65 and older.

 

Fact #2: The racial/ethnic groups that are the least educated are the fastest growing.
The greatest increase in population growth in the U.S. workforce is occurring among those racial/ethnic groups with the lowest level of education, while the group reaching retirement age is predominantly white with higher levels of education. In 2000, whites ages 25 to 64 were twice as likely as African-Americans to have a bachelor’s degree, and almost three times as likely as Hispanics/Latinos

 

Additionally, the gaps among racial/ethnic groups in levels of education completed are widening. Of the working-age population, from 1980 to 2000 whites and Asian-Americans made the most progress in attaining a bachelor’s degree or higher, while African-Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics/Latinos made the least progress.

The educational gap between whites and Hispanics/Latinos (as measured by the percentage of the working-age population with a bachelor’s degree or higher) has almost doubled over the last two decades—growing from 12 percentage points in 1980 to 19 percentage points in 2000. The gap between whites and African-Americans has expanded from 11 percentage points in 1980 to 15 percentage points in 2000.

 

Another gauge of educational performance of particular populations is their level of success in progressing from high school to a college degree. About 50% of African-American and Hispanic/Latino 9th  graders do not become eligible to enter college after four years of high school because they have not completed high school. Though the most telling indicators of college preparation are generally said to be standardized test scores, rigorous course-taking, and dual enrollment—all of which are important—the single largest barrier to college entrance for African-Americans and Hispanics/Latinos appears to be high school completion.

 

IMPACT: The Impact of Changing Demographics
Given the changing demographics of the nation’s workforce over the next two decades, the current educational disparities among racial/ethnic groups are projected to lead to a decline in the educational level of the U.S. workforce as a whole. This drop in the levels of education completed would in turn result in a decrease in personal income per capita among Americans.

 

Juvenile Justice

According to the Department of Juvenile Justice: 225,000 youths are arrested in California each year,

270 youth attended the Department of Juvenile Justice’s accredited school district.  270 youth received their diploma, 105 received their GED, 185 received their CTE certification and 205 enrolled in college.

 

The framework for the Department of Juvenile Justice’s programs is the Integrated Behavior Treatment Model. It is designed to reduce institutional violence and future criminal behavior by teaching anti-criminal attitudes and providing personal skills for youth to better manage their environment.

 

DJJ provides academic and vocational education, treatment programs that address violent and criminogenic behavior, sex offender behavior, and substance abuse and mental health problems, and medical care, while maintaining a safe and secure environment conducive to learning.

 

Through collaboration with the youth, the team administers a case plan that takes advantage of each youth’s personal strengths to maximize treatment in other areas of their life to reduce the risk of re-offending.
http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Juvenile_Justice/index.html

 

According to the California Education Authority (CEA) Academic Progress Report in the year 2010-2011 270 youth attended the DJJ’s accredited school district.  270 youth received their diploma, 105 received their GED, 185 received their CTE certification and 205 enrolled in college. http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Juvenile_Justice/Education_Services.html

 

Teen Suicide:

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 25-34 year olds and the third leading cause of death among
15- to 24-year olds.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

. In 2009, 14% of high school students seriously considered attempting suicide, and 11% made a plan about how they would attempt suicide during the 12 months before the survey (Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance, 2009).
. Suicide is a preventable public health problem.
. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 25-34 year olds and the third leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year olds (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS), CDC, 2007).
. Ninety percent of suicides that take place in the United States are associated with mental illness, including disorders involving the abuse of alcohol and other drugs.1
. Males complete suicide at a rate 3.6 times that of females. However, females attempt suicide three times more often than males (CDC, 2007).

 

 

A FEW WARNING SIGNS

  • Feeling hopeless
  • Feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge
  • Acting reckless or engaging in risky activities - seemingly without thinking
  • Feeling trapped - like there's no way out
  • Increasing alcohol or drug use
  • Withdrawing from friends, family, and society
  • Feeling anxious, agitated, or unable to sleep or sleeping all the time
  • Experiencing dramatic mood changes
  • Seeing no reason for living or having no sense of purpose in life

 

WWW.LACOUNTY.GOV
FACTS AND RESEARCH FINDINGS ABOUT SUICIDE